Retiring in Williamsburg Blog

Lifestyles, Community Information. Helping you find your new home

If Williamsburg is in the top 3 to visit – wouldn’t you just rather MOVE here?

Leave a comment

Smithsonian magazine has named  Williamsburg, Virginia number 3 on its list of best small towns to visit. The locals know it. The tourists find out about and always want to come back. Why wouldn’t someone want to retire here?

The following is the excerpt about Williamsburg being the NUMBER 3 small town to visit, in America:

The hem of a calico skirt disappearing around a corner, lowering light on the Bruton Parish Church steeple (which houses the same brass bell that rang for George Washington himself), the sound of a door being bolted and, from a tavern on Duke of Gloucester Street, a fiddle: This is Colonial Williamsburg calling it a day, which is kind of what it did after its service as the cradle of American ideals was over and the Virginia capital moved to Richmond in 1780. For the next 150 years the Tidewater town was so sidestepped by time and events that city fathers forgot to hold a municipal election in 1912.

Entering the 300-acre historic district, you encounter people in 18th-century dress actually plying colonial trades such as shoemaking, brickmaking, weaving and blacksmithing. Patrick Henry fulminates against the Stamp Act in the House of Burgesses. Citizens protest that Lord Dunmore, Royal Governor of the Virginia Colony, confiscated gunpowder from the magazine after shots rang out in Lexington and Concord.

Apprentice Abby Cox plies her trade in a Colonial Williamsburg millinery shop, where hats and dresses are made with 18th-century technology. (Matt Eich)
Tourists can mingle with re-enactors on the streets of colonial Williamsburg. (Matt Eich)
Tourists can mingle with re-enactors on the streets of colonial Williamsburg. (Matt Eich)

Yet the 21st century isn’t hard to find. Residents hit the Saturday farmer’s market in Merchants Square and take part in Art Month, a fall festival that opens galleries, stages concerts, sponsors Virginia wine tastings and turns Duke of Gloucester Street in the historic village into a fine arts fair. William & Mary has its Muscarelle Museum of Art and Phi Beta Kappa Hall, where the Virginia Symphony Orchestra performs. But there’s no doubt the past is the town’s favorite pastime, even middle schoolers put their video-game consoles aside to perform with the Fifes and Drums.

If that hasn’t roused your interest in living in and falling in love with Williamsburg, there is no hope for me to be your Real Estate Buyer’s Agent! If it has tickled your fancy, pop over to my “Contact Us” page and drop me a line.

image

Here are the 10 best small towns (with populations under 15,000), according to the Smithsonian:
1). Chautauqua, NY
2). Healdsburg, CA
3). Williamsburg, VA
4). Steamboat Springs, CO
5). Woods Hole, MA
6). Marietta, OH
7). Beaufort, SC
8). Sedona, AZ
9). Nebraska City, NE
10). Lanesboro, MN

Have you liked us on Facebook, yet?

rolf kramer, real estate, Williamsburg, VARolf Kramer, REALTOR®, ABR, SRES, e-PRO 757-564-4455

Licensed in Virginia with Liz Moore and Associates, 5350 Discovery Park Blvd, Williamsburg, VA 23188

Williamsburg has become a Mecca for retirees over the past dozen years because of its history, charm, vacation amenities, proximity to major cities and airports, and affordable cost of living. Check out www.retiringinwilliamsburg.com for information about the Williamsburg community, lifestyles available, and search for homes for sale.

Advertisements

Author: retiringinwilliamsburgrolfkramer

Licensed in Virginia with Liz Moore and Associates, 5350 Discovery Park Blvd, Williamsburg, VA 23188 Williamsburg has become a Mecca for retirees over the past dozen years because of its history, charm, vacation amenities, proximity to major cities and airports, and affordable cost of living. Check out www.retiringinwilliamsburg.com for information about the Williamsburg community, lifestyles available, and search for homes for sale.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s